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Famous Immigrants

Jim Carrey
Canada

Life opens up opportunities to you, and you either take them or you stay afraid of taking them.

Carlos Santana
Mexico

One day there will be no borders, no boundaries, no flags and no countries and the only passport will be the heart.

Licensed to Practice State Law in Colorado and California

Humanitarian Visas

USCIS provides a number of humanitarian programs and protection to assist individuals in need of shelter or aid from disasters, oppression, emergency medical issues and other urgent circumstances.

Battered Spouse, Children & Parents

As a battered spouse, child or parent, you may file an immigrant visa petition under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), as amended by the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

The VAWA provisions in the INA allow certain spouses, children, and parents of U.S. citizens and certain spouses and children of permanent residents (Green Card holders) to file a petition for themselves, without the abuser’s knowledge. This allows victims to seek both safety and independence from their abuser, who is not notified about the filing.

The VAWA provisions, which apply equally to women and men, are permanent and do not require congressional reauthorization.

Help is also available from the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 or 1-800-787-3224 (TDD). The hotline has information about shelters, mental health care, legal advice and other types of assistance, including information about filing for immigration status. For more information, visit the National Domestic Violence website.

For more information, please go to http://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/battered-spouse-children-parents

Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Process

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that certain people who came to the United States as children and meet several key guidelines may request consideration of deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal, and would then be eligible for work authorization.

Individuals who can demonstrate through verifiable documentation that they meet these guidelines will be considered for deferred action. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis under the guidelines set forth in the Secretary of Homeland Security’s memorandum.  For more information, please go to http://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/consideration-deferred-action-childhood-arrivals-process/frequently-asked-questions

You may request consideration of deferred action for childhood arrivals if you:

  1.   Were under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012;
  2.   Came to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday;
  3.   Have continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time;
  4.   Were physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of making your request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS;
  5.   Entered without inspection before June 15, 2012, or your lawful immigration status expired as of June 15, 2012;
  6.   Are currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or other equivalent State-authorized exam in the United States, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and
  7.   Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor, three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.
    Individuals can call USCIS at 1-800-375-5283 with questions or to request more information on the deferred action for childhood arrivals process or visit www.uscis.gov.

In September 2012, USCIS started deferring action for certain childhood arrivals and issuing employment authorization for a period of two years. Beginning in September 2014, the initial two-year grants of deferred action for early recipients of DACA from USCIS are due to expire under their own terms, and USCIS is actively preparing for the DACA renewal process so that eligible individuals can request and receive an extension of their deferred action without experiencing any lapse in their lawful presence or work authorization.

In late May 2014, USCIS anticipates publishing a new dual-use Form I-821D, Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, to allow for both initial and renewal requests, and updating Frequently Asked Questions with additional information. If you received DACA from USCIS and will seek to renew, you must wait until USCIS publishes the new form before filing your renewal request. If you are filing for initial DACA, you may continue to file using the current form until the new version is available (See below for additional information).

To help prepare the public for the anticipated process to request a renewal of DACA from USCIS, we have created an outline found below. This outline is subject to change until USCIS announces the details of the final process in late May 2014.

Click Here to View/Download in PDF.

Victims of Human Trafficking & Other Crimes

USCIS helps protect victims of human trafficking and other crimes by providing immigration relief. Human trafficking, also known as trafficking in persons, is a form of modern-day slavery in which traffickers lure individuals with false promises of employment and a better life.   Please also go to http://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/victims-human-trafficking-other-crimes

Individuals and their families may also fall victim to many other types of crime in the United States. These crimes include: rape, murder, manslaughter, domestic violence, sexual assault, and many others.

There are two types of immigration relief we provide to victims of human trafficking and other crimes:

T Nonimmigrant Status (T Visa)

T nonimmigrant status provides immigration protection to victims of trafficking. The T Visa allows victims to remain in the United States and assist law enforcement authorities in the investigation or prosecution of human trafficking cases.

U Nonimmigrant Status (U Visa)

U nonimmigrant status provides immigration protection to crime victims who have suffered substantial mental or physical abuse as a result of the crime. The U visa allows victims to remain in the United States and assist law enforcement authorities in the investigation or prosecution of the criminal activity.

Resources

USCIS offers resources for victims of human trafficking and other crimes and the organizations that serve them. This information is designed to help answer any questions you or your family might have about obtaining T or U Nonimmigrant status.  USCIS has also developed additional materials specifically for law enforcement agencies. Please see Resources for Victims of Human Trafficking & Other Crimes for more information.

Contact USCIS

USCIS is dedicated to informing law enforcement and community based organizations about the forms of relief offered to victims of human trafficking, domestic violence and other crimes. To receive training on this topic, please send an email to T-UVAWATraining@dhs.gov

For more information please call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center  888-3737-888.   Learn more about human trafficking through the Department of Homeland Security’s Blue Campaignhttp://www.dhs.gov/end-human-trafficking

Temporary Protected Status  – TPS

What is TPS?

The Secretary of Homeland Security may designate a foreign country for TPS due to conditions in the country that temporarily prevent the country’s nationals from returning safely, or in certain circumstances, where the country is unable to handle the return of its nationals adequately.  USCIS may grant TPS to eligible nationals of certain countries (or parts of countries), who are already in the United States.  Eligible individuals without nationality who last resided in the designated country may also be granted TPS.

The Secretary may designate a country for TPS due to the following temporary conditions in the country:

  • Ongoing armed conflict (such as civil war)
  • An environmental disaster (such as earthquake or hurricane), or an epidemic
  • Other extraordinary and temporary conditions

Currently, El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, and Syria have been designated for TPS.  For the requirements, please refer to http://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/temporary-protected-status-deferred-enforced-departure/temporary-protected-status

During a designated period, individuals who are TPS beneficiaries or who are found preliminarily eligible for TPS upon initial review of their cases (prima facie eligible):

  • Are not removable from the United States
  • Can obtain an employment authorization document (EAD)
  • May be granted travel authorization

Once granted TPS, an individual also cannot be detained by DHS on the basis of his or her immigration status in the United States.

TPS is a temporary benefit that does not lead to lawful permanent resident status or give any other immigration status. However, registration for TPS does not prevent you from:

  • Applying for nonimmigrant status
  • Filing for adjustment of status based on an immigrant petition
  • Applying for any other immigration benefit or protection for which you may be eligible

PLEASE NOTE: To be granted any other immigration benefit you must still meet all the eligibility requirements for that particular benefit.  An application for TPS does not affect an application for asylum or any other immigration benefit and vice versa. Denial of an application for asylum or any other immigration benefit does not affect your ability to register for TPS, although the grounds of denial of that application may also lead to denial of TPS.

For more information, go to http://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/temporary-protected-status-deferred-enforced-departure/temporary-protected-status

Asylum

Every year people come to the United States seeking protection because they have suffered persecution or fear that they will suffer persecution due to:

  • Race
  • Religion
  • Nationality
  • Membership in a particular social group
  • Political opinion

If you are eligible for asylum you may be permitted to remain in the United States. To apply for Asylum, file a Form I-589, Application for Asylum and for Withholding of Removal, within one year of your arrival to the United States. There is no fee to apply for asylum.

You may include your spouse and children who are in the United States on your application at the time you file or at any time until a final decision is made on your case. To include your child on your application, the child must be under 21 and unmarried. For more information see our Form I-589, Application for Asylum and for Withholding of Removal page.

Permission to Work in the United States

You cannot apply for permission to work (employment authorization) in the United States at the same time you apply for asylum.

You may apply for employment authorization if:

  • 150 days have passed since you filed your complete asylum application, excluding any delays caused by you (such as a request to reschedule your interview) AND
  • No decision has been made on your application

If you are granted asylum you may work immediately. Some asylees choose to obtain Employment Authorization Documents (EADs) for convenience or identification purposes, but an EAD is not necessary to work if you are an asylee.

To apply for employment authorization, you must file a Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization.  There is no fee to apply for your first EAD if you have a pending asylum application or if you have been granted asylum.  For more information, please refer to http://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/refugees-asylum/asylum

Refugees

Under United States law, a refugee is someone who:

  • Is located outside of the United States
  • Is of special humanitarian concern to the United States
  • Demonstrates that they were persecuted or fear persecution due to race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership in a particular social group
  • Is not firmly resettled in another country
  • Is admissible to the United States

A refugee does not include anyone who ordered, incited, assisted, or otherwise participated in the persecution of any person on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion.

For the legal definition of refugee, see section 101(a)(42) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

The Refugee Process

You must receive a referral to the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) for consideration as a refugee. For more information on the referral criteria, see the USRAP Consultations and Worldwide Processing Priorities page at http://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/refugees-asylum/refugees/united-states-refugee-admissions-program-usrap-consultation-worldwide-processing-priorities

If you receive a referral, you will receive help filling out your application and then be interviewed abroad by a USCIS officer who will determine whether you are eligible for refugee resettlement. For more information about eligibility, please go to Refugee Eligibility Determination  http://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/refugees-asylum/refugees/refugee-eligibility-determination

Your case may include your spouse, child (unmarried and under 21years of age), and in some limited circumstances, other family members..  You may include a same-sex spouse in your application provided that you and your spouse are legally married.  As a general matter, USCIS looks to the law of the place where the marriage took place when determining whether it is valid for immigration law purposes. Same-sex partners who are not married but who are qualified  to access the U.S. Refugee Admissions under one of the three designated worldwide processing priorities may have their cases cross-referenced  so that they can be interviewed at the same time and, if approved by USCIS, resettled in the same geographic area in the United States.

Humanitarian Parole

Humanitarian parole is used sparingly to bring someone who is otherwise inadmissible into the United States for a temporary period of time due to a compelling emergency.

USCIS may grant parole temporarily:

  • To anyone applying for admission into the United States based on urgent humanitarian reasons or if there is a significant public benefit
  • For a period of time that corresponds with the length of the emergency or humanitarian situation

Parolees must depart the United States before the expiration of their parole.  You may submit a request for reparole, which must be approved by USCIS. Parole does not grant any immigration benefits.

Requirements for Parole

  • Anyone can file an application for humanitarian parole.
  • You may file an application for parole if you cannot obtain the necessary admission documents from the Department of State
  • You cannot use parole to avoid normal visa-issuing procedures or to bypass immigration procedures. As noted above, there must be an urgent humanitarian reason or significant public benefit for the parole to be granted

Filing for Parole

To file for parole you must:

If you are represented by an attorney, he or she must file a Form G-28, Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Representative.

http://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/humanitarian-parole

 

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